Friday, January 31, 2014

Flashback Friday: Tartine Country Bread

We've come a long way, haven't we? So, it got me thinking, right, that it would be fun to celebrate this road so travelled in some way. Then I had an epiphany. I decided it would be a hoot to start Flashback Friday posts, you know, to revisit some old faves from Book Two, perhaps visit some things that I never got to at all, rectify some things I did altogether wrong.

And timing is everything.

This week I got a few emails from new bakers asking for my advice about which loaf on the blog to try first. Et voila! The perfect week to start our Flashback Friday posts, and so why not begin with the most famous loaf of them all, the Tartine Country Bread. It's the most challenging for new bakers with new starters to master, and the most elementary bread in the book. I remember my first one. Not bad, considering. I remember how over the moon I was when I pulled it out of the oven and the crust sang, just like Chad said it would, and the crumb was open, just like Chad promised. It was a little flat, I remember that, and a little wonky-shaped. But it was perfect. And I loved it. It's that loaf of bread that kept me going.

I always like to tell people new to bread baking to choose something simple. Something that won't fail. There is nothing more fantastic than pulling that first perfect loaf of bread out of the oven. It's the one thing, the only thing that will keep you baking. My father used to say: 'You need some successes so you have a reason to keep moving forward'. Daddy was always right.

So, with this wisdom ringing in my ears, I decided to bake up two loaves, one done my old-school way with a higher levain percentage, for old time's sake, yeah, and because I think it works really well with new starters so it's easy for people new to baking. I call it my Tartine Country Bread with training wheels...


Tartine Country Bread with 250g levain (a.k.a. the 'Training Wheels' loaf)

And then I baked one for when newbies have gathered more confidence (by the way, I'm still a newbie), one with a smaller levain. And lo! She ended up looking like the most gorgeous moon.


Tartine Country Bread with 150g levain (a.k.a. 'La Bella Luna') 

Training Wheels grew fabulous ears, and La Bella Luna left my friends moonstruck by her beauty. Both were fabulous in flavor with a light crumb texture, and each yielded an uber shattery crust. Hooray!

Oh how we struggled at the start but today we can do this one with our eyes closed. Damn we're good.

P.S., you don't have to be a newbie to make these two loaves. They are equally as fabulous for bakers with lots of loaves under their belts.

Have a look.

Tartine Training Wheels Loaf
This formula makes one loaf

MAKE YOUR LEVAIN

You will need:

50g 100% hydration dark rye starter (mine is made with BRM home-milled dark rye flour)
50g Community Grains hard red winter wheat flour
50g KA all-purpose flour
100g room temperature water

Mix the levain ingredients together until you reach a paste. It will be thinnish, like this:




Mine fermented for 7 hours and 20 minutes. You will know when it's ready, because it will look like this:




DOUGH DAY

You will need:

All of the levain
450g KA Bread flour
50g Community Grains hard red winter wheat flour
330g h2o
12g Diamond kosher salt

When your levain is properly fermented, mix together the levain, the flours, and the h2o until you reach a shaggy mass. It will look like this:



Autolyse for 2 hours.

After the autolyse, the dough should have expanded and look smooth and elastic like this:



Squish the salt into the dough until it's fully incorporated work the dough into a smooth mass. Now it's time for the 4-hour bulk fermentation (I got a phone call toward the end of my bulk and mine fermented for 4 hours and 30 minutes! But it was fine. Yours will ferment for about 4 hours).

Every half hour, perform a series of turns throughout the entire bulk fermentation, taking care not to deflate the dough as you near the end of bulk.

When bulk fermentation is accomplished, turn the dough out onto a workspace dusted with brown rice flour, and shape into a loose round. Let it rest. Drape with a damp paper towel to keep it from forming a skin. Mine rested for 10 minutes. 

After the bench, shape the dough into a taut boule and pop into a banneton or a bowl lined with linen that you have dusted with brown rice flour.

Pop in the fridge and ferment. Mine fermented for 16 hour and 23 minutes.

BAKE DAY

Preheat the oven to 500 with a dutch oven and baking stone inside.

Dust the dough lightly with brown rice flour then unearth by placing a sheet of parchment over the mouth of the dough bowl, then place a peel over this and quickly invert the bowl so that the dough ends up sitting on the paper and the peel, seam side down.

Slash the dough in some divine manner, then slide it into the shallow half of the hot dutchie. Cover with the fat half, slide it into the oven, and steam for 15 minutes at this temp, then turn the oven down to 475 and steam for another 15 minutes.

After the steam, remove the fat end of the dutchie, then stack the pan over its mouth to create a buffer between the hot stone and the bread. This will help keep the bottom of your bread from blackening.

Toggle the oven between 460 and 475 until the boule is baked to desired darkness. I find that it's almost impossible to go as dark as Chad's without drying out the loaf in a home oven. So I aim for chestnut-colored.

Cool on a wire rack for at least an hour before slicing.

Training Wheels (are hot)




.
.
La Bella Luna
This formula makes one loaf

MAKE YOUR LEVAIN

You will need:

10g 100% hydration dark rye starter (mine is made with BRM home-milled dark rye flour)
75g BRM home-milled hard red spring flour
75g room temperature h2o, mine was 71 degrees

Mix the levain ingredients together until you reach a paste. Mine fermented for 6 hours 30 minutes. 

DOUGH DAY

You will need:

All of the levain
450g KA Bread flour
50g BRM home-milled hard red spring flour
377g h2o, mine was 72 degrees
12g Diamond kosher salt

When your levain is properly fermented, mix together the levain, the flours, and the h2o until you reach a shaggy mass.

Autolyse for 1 hour 15 minutes.

After autolyse, squish the salt into the dough until it's fully incorporated work the dough into a smooth mass. Now it's time for the 4-hour bulk fermentation (mine actually fermented for 4 hours 23 minutes because the dough was a little on the small side. It needed a little more time).

Every half hour, perform a series of turns throughout the entire bulk fermentation, taking care not to deflate the dough as you near the end of bulk.

When bulk fermentation is accomplished, turn the dough out onto a workspace dusted with brown rice flour, and shape into a loose round. Let it rest. Drape with a damp paper towel to keep it from forming a skin. Mine rested for 25 minutes. 

After the bench, shape the dough into a taut boule and pop into a banneton or a bowl lined with linen that you have dusted with brown rice flour.

Pop in the fridge and ferment. Mine fermented for 20 hours.

BAKE DAY

Preheat the oven to 500 with a dutch oven and baking stone inside.

Dust the dough lightly with brown rice flour then unearth by placing a sheet of parchment over the mouth of the dough bowl, then place a peel over this and quickly invert the bowl so that the dough ends up sitting on the paper and the peel, seam side down.

Slash the dough in some divine manner, then slide it into the shallow half of the hot dutchie. Cover with the fat half, slide it into the oven, and steam for 15 minutes at this temp, then turn the oven down to 475 and steam for another 15 minutes.

After the steam, remove the fat end of the dutchie, then stack the pan over its mouth to create a buffer between the hot stone and the bread. This will help keep the bottom of your bread from blackening.

Toggle the oven between 460 and 475 until the boule is baked to desired darkness. I find that it's almost impossible to go as dark as Chad's without drying out the loaf in a home oven. So I aim for chestnut-colored.

Cool on a wire rack for at least an hour before slicing.

La Bella Luna!

To the staff of life!

7 comments:

  1. Yay! A new installment. Since finding your site, I've read the entire blog and have learned so much. I am in the process of convincing my far flung friends to grow their starters and bake their own breads under your tutelage. Now fully armed with T3 and a Komo mill I look forward to your insights and baking along with you. Thanks for the hint re:Jovial High Extraction flour. The first loaf using it will come out of the oven tomorrow, and I can't wait! happy baking!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Pamela. I feel like I'm running as fast as I can to keep up. I have TWO MORE breads baked and photographed that I want to post, aside from the next loaf in the book. I did a lot of work with the sifting screens. I'm getting there! I swear!

    Have your friends try the square one post. http://tartine-bread.blogspot.com/2013/02/9-days.html

    How fun! To have a little bread club with your friends! I would love that :) alas, my friends like to eat the bread, but no interest in baking it. Except my friend Joe. Thank God for him. We talk bread via email and text. He lives in Brooklyn, I'm in L.A. Many a night has found us chatting about flour, dough, hydration, fermentation...

    Look for a new post on Sunday!

    xo

    ReplyDelete
  3. You rock! I tried the training loaf and it totally had the most spring to date! My daughter called it the "best batch ever"! Thank you!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Awwww. You are so sweet :) You have to send me pictures of all of your bread. You have been baking up a storm!

      xo

      Delete
  4. Your bread looks amazing with such an open crumb. I have yet to achieve that. I was wondering if you would mind taking a look at mine and give some tips in the process?

    https://thedomenico.wordpress.com/2015/01/21/tartine-bread-1/
    https://thedomenico.wordpress.com/2015/01/21/tartine-bread-2/

    Thank you so much!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. your bread looks fantastic! for a more open crumb, increase hydration. that should do it. but your bread looks really lovely :)

      Delete
  5. Hello France, when you say to add KA all-purpose flour, do you mean (unbleached all-purpose flour)? Please get back soon, thank you. ��

    ReplyDelete

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